Skip to main content

Perl Las Blue Cheese, Bacon and Spring Onion Buttermilk Scones


Perl Las is an award winning Welsh Blue Cheese produced by Caws Cenarth Cheese from organic cows milk. It's a beautiful creamy cheese, with its origins as a Caerphilly cheese, and which has delicate blue overtones which, while strong, are not overpowering. With St David's Day in mind, I fancied trying the Perl Las out in some savoury scone recipes.  After doing some research, nothing I found was quite right, so I decided to try and amalgamate some ideas to produce my own version.

Although I used Perl Las, you could use any blue cheese, but you will get a slightly different flavour. I decided I wanted to add some bacon, after all blue cheese and bacon hold a natural affinity. To freshen the taste, I also decided to use some chopped spring onion. The resulting scone tastes gorgeous; lovely and cheesy with the bacon giving a salty bite and a background hint of sweetness from the sugar. If there was anything I'd consider adding, it might be to add in some ground black pepper. However, Mike thought they were fab as is (although he did take a sample of four scones before he made up his mind ;-) ). We also tried them spread with a little cranberry and red onion marmalade - all I can say is wow! Well worth it.

  
 Ingredients (makes 10)

225g plain flour
80g sugar
1 tbspn baking powder
1/2 tspn salt
85g cold unsalted butter, diced
1 large egg
120ml buttermilk
175g Perl Las cheese, crumbled
2 spring onions, chopped
4 rashers good streaky bacon, cooked till crisp then drained and crumbled

a beaten egg to glaze the scones before cooking

Preheat the oven to 180 fan / 200 conventional.

Place the flour, salt and baking powder in a bowl. Rub in the cold butter until the butter resembles lumps no bigger than small peas and is well distributed throughout the flour. (I used my KitchenAid to do this, using the flat beater for about 3-4 minutes).


Add the sugar, cheese, bacon and spring onions. Mix through.

Add the egg and the buttermilk and mix to form a soft and sticky dough - do not overwork.

Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead slightly to bring together. Pat out to a depth of 1/2 inch. Cut out scones and place on a baking sheet (I use one with a silicone liner). Brush with a little beaten egg,


Bake in the middle of the oven for 12 - 15 minutes till risen and golden.

Remove to a wire rack and allow to cool.



These are lovely still warm from the oven with a bit of relish or chutney.


The flavour develops as they cool, but as with all scones, they are best eaten on the day they are made. I hope you like them.

Susie

Comments

  1. These look amazing! Can't go wrong with bacon and cheese :) I don't know why I've never made my own scones.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks. Every so often I get a craving for something savoury rather than sweet and these fit the bill. Love bacon :-) .

      Delete
  2. Dear Susie! I absolutely love these scone idea! It's like a perfect breakfast in a scone - yum!! Have a great day!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oooh - those look gorgeous - we're big blue cheese fans, and I don't know why I haven't thought of baking with it before ... some experimenting to ensue once I've given these a go!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks. I know what you mean. I couldn't help snacking on cheese as I made them! :)

      Delete
  4. Hi Susie:
    I saw your post over on Scarletta bakes.
    You mentioned your scones there and instantly I was caught in your net.
    Your being a brit didn't hurt either.

    I'm a female Canadian, but with British roots.
    I love the British side of me. My Grandma was British as well as my Grandfather.
    My aim in my kitchen is to cook like my Grandma. So that everything melts in your mouth.

    It is interesting that you are in Cardiff.
    I have a cousin (well 3rd cousin) in the Archives there.
    I have kept in touch with her Mama for almost 40 years.

    At any rate your scones sound wonderful, and I am definitely going to make them.
    I have also subscribed to your post.

    Oh! What substitute would say would be closest to your blue cheese?
    I definitely can't get yours here :~((

    Charlie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Charlie

      I'm so, so sorry but I only found your comment today in my 'spam' filter (I didn't even know I had one until today - I need a blogging 101 course!).

      Wow, I'm amazed at the Canada - Cardiff connection. My grandmother's brother emigrated to Toronto around the beginning of the 20th Century, but we have lost touch with the family. I know he has descendents out there still, as I remember my mum received a letter from them some years ago. Sadly, she has dementia now, so doesn't remember anything, and we can't find the letter now.

      Anyway, thank you for your lovely comments. You could use any blue cheese that can be crumbled (so not a soft, spreadable one). Something like Stilton perhaps? I don't know if you can get that there, but it's probably the most famous British blue cheese, so if you can't find it, you may know of it and be able to find something that's similar.:)

      Best wishes,

      Susie

      Delete

Post a Comment

Your comments are very much appreciated.

Popular posts from this blog

Dark Indulgent Chocolate and Walnut Brownies for the Weekly Bake Off

It's been a great couple of weeks in the Bake Off , as Amy has chosen some fantastic chocolate recipes from Mary Berry's 100 Cakes and Bakes . Although I made last week's American Chocolate Ripple Cheesecake, I didn't enter it. Not because it was a disaster (it was incredibly delicious though very rich - Josh has been able to eek it out all week as he only needs a little piece to get his daily chocolate fix!), but I simply ran out of time. So this week, I decided to get my skates on and make the bake early. Particularly as it's brownies. Yes. Brownies. Those dark, fudgey, chocolatey little bites of heaven. But for me, this week was an experiment. You see, I already have a fantastic brownie recipe . It's been made countless times and been played around with to give an endless variety of treats. (Have I ever mentioned Maya Gold in brownies? Yes? Well I'll have to post about them someday soon because they are amazing - like some sort of out of body exp

Not Viennese, but Swiss Cakes for the Weekly Bake Off

One of my strongest childhood memories is the ritual of our family's Sunday Tea, which always took a certain form. My nan would put the kettle on at just before 4pm, and a pot of steaming hot tea would soon be brewed. There were sandwiches, and always, always some form of cake. Quite often, if nan and mum had had a busy weekend, it would be provided by Mr Kipling. My brother and I looked forward to this with some enthusiasm, as there were quite often French Fancies and Vienniese Whirls, which were our hands-down favourites. We could leave the Battenburg Slices, and the jam tarts were often a bit too dry  for us (definitely not as good as homemade). But the soft sweet inside of an iced French Fancy (my favourite being the lemon yellow ones), and the moistness of the Viennese Whirls were something to savour. Of course, you can still buy these. But they just don't seem to taste the same somehow. So when Amy announced this week's Bake Off challenge as the Apricot Swiss

Farmhouse Orange Victoria Sandwich for the Weekly Bake Off

I was really pleased with Amy's selection for this week's Bake Off - Mary Berry's Ultimate Cake Book was the first Baking book I bought, back in 1995 (it was first published in 1994 and by the time I bought a copy it was already on its eighth reprint). The very first recipe I did was her small all in one Victoria Sandwich, and consequently the very first cake tins I purchased were Silverwood 7" sandwich tins. They have seen many, many outings over the years, by way of this cake and the Sunday Best Chocolate Fudge Cake, also from the same book. I still have them and used them for this recipe. Interestingly, in flicking through 'Ultimate Cake Book', I caught sight of an Orange Victoria Sandwich, which is practically the same recipe as this one (size aside), with the exception of the filling, where Mary instructed that it should be 'about 4 tablespoons of orange mamalade and a little caster sugar'. Hmm, not sure about that one. I certainly loved the